Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET or PETE)

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PET is one of the most widely used and widely recycled plastics — e.g. mineral water and soft drink bottles are made of PET. As with virgin PET, r-PET can be used to make many new products, including polyester fibre for clothing, home textiles, automotive parts, roof insulation and new PET packaging and bottles. It is generally blended in a ratio of virgin to recycled, depending on the application.
Baled PET Bottles

Baled PET Bottles

PET Flakes

PET Flakes

PET Strap

PET Strap

High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

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Most milk jugs, detergent and juice bottles, butter tubs, and toiletries’ containers are made of HDPE. Usually opaque in color, this plastic is considered safe and has low risk of leaching. Like PET, HDPE is widely recycled. As a thermoplastic with a very high strength to density ration, recycled HDPE has a wide range of applications such as piping, plastic lumber, buckets, recycling bins, playground equipment etc.
HDPE Film Scrap

HDPE Film Scrap

HDPE Drum Scrap

HDPE Drum Scrap

HDPE Injection Grade Grinding

HDPE Injection Grade Grinding

Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

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PVC, although tough in terms of strength, is not considered safe for cooking or heating. PVC contains softening chemicals called phthalates that interfere with hormonal development. Recycled PVC is used to make food wrap, bottles for cooking oil, shower curtains, inflatable mattresses, and common plumbing pipes.
PVC Pipe Scrap

PVC Pipe Scrap

PVC Profile Scrap

PVC Profile Scrap

PVC Mix Scrap

PVC Mix Scrap

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE)

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Used to make grocery bags, some food wraps, squeezable bottles, and bread bags, this plastic is relatively safe and largely poses an environmental problem if disposed incorrectly. LDPE is recyclable but very few programs accept them. We suggest reusing bags or avoiding them altogether by opting for reusable totes during shopping
LDPE Film Scrap

LDPE Film Scrap

LDPE Granules Scrap

LDPE Granules Scrap

LDPE Bottles Scrap

LDPE Bottles Scrap

Polypropylene (PP)

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Common items made of PP include yogurt cups, medicine and ketchup bottles, kitchenware and “microwave-safe” plastic containers. Polypropylene is considered microwave-safe because it is heat resistant doesn’t get warped in the microwave, but this does not mean it is healthy to consume foods that have been microwaved in it. Recycled PP Is used to make autoparts and industrial fibres.
PP Film Scrap

PP Film Scrap

PP Strap Scrap

PP Strap Scrap

Household Waste

Household Waste

Polystyrene

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Polystyrene is the styrofoam used for takeout food containers (clamshell design), disposable cups and bowls and bike helmets. This lightweight plastic has a lot of uses but unfortunately it is also very weak and breaks easily and disperses through the environment. Not commonly recycled, it is best to phase out this type of plastic from our lives as it also leaches styrene, a possible carcinogen, into food products.
HIPS Scrap

HIPS Scrap

ABS Scrap

ABS Scrap

Nylon Scrap

Nylon Scrap

Others

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This category is all that cannot be classified within the other six and includes bioplastics, and other mixed plastics. The use of plastic in this category is at your own risk since you have no idea what chemicals are in it. Polycarbonate (PC) is one example of a type #7 plastic however the bisphenol A (BPA) contained inside PC have been linked to numerous health problems.

SUMMARY: It is difficult to recycle #6 and #7. Plastics in categories #2, #4 and #5 are generally considered safe but avoid putting them the microwave/heating even if they are labelled ‘microwave-safe’. Plastic #1 when safe should not be reused.